286 East State Road 434
Longwood, FL 32750
My Blog

Posts for tag: root canal

By Ilya V. Freyman, DMD
July 24, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  

Pull a tooth or save it? The easy and correct answer is to save it, if possible. At Dr. Ilya Freyman's Longwood FL office, patients may undergo root canal therapy, a restorative procedure that works wonders. If your Longwood FL Dentist says, "You need a root canal," by all means, go for it.

What is a root canal, and why would you need it?

A root canal is a nickname for endodontic therapy during which your dentist accesses and removes soft tissue from the slender passages in your tooth roots. These chambers contain tiny nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue.

Healthline reports that the number of root canals in a single tooth depends on its size and position. Front teeth have one to two canals while a large molar in the back of the mouth may have four.

When damaged by a blow to the mouth, infection, or decay, the interior soft tissue experiences symptoms such as inflammation and throbbing pain. Also, you may have pimples or pus on your gums, a noticeable crack, or discolored tooth enamel. A visual inspection and X-rays tell your Longwood FL Dentist if he can save the tooth or just extract it.

Other reasons for root canal therapy are:

  • Tooth impaction (encased in bone or gums)
  • Deep decay
  • Weak structure or improper size and shape

Quick and painless

Most people think root canal therapy is painful, but honestly, it's just like getting a big filling. After looking at your tooth and X-raying it, Dr. Freyman gives you some local anesthetic. Also, he installs a dam to keep tooth material from infiltrating your mouth and throat.

The procedure involves opening each canal, cleaning out the diseased pulp, adding antibiotic medication, and filling it with gutta-percha, a biocompatible sealant. She covers the tooth with a temporary filling or crown. Healing takes about a week after which you'll return to the office for placement of a permanent ceramic crown.

Giving teeth a second chance

Root canal therapy spares 15 million teeth in the US alone, says the American Association of Endodontists. Most of these teeth will survive many years, keeping smiles intact and bright.

If you're concerned about the health or strength of a tooth, or if you're in pain, call Dr. Ilya Freyman in his Longwood FL office. He'll evaluate that tooth and promptly treat it. You may need a root canal! Contact us at (407) 260-0224.

By Ilya V. Freyman, DMD
May 21, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  
RootCanalAwarenessWeekATimetoLearnHowTeethAreSaved

What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you think of the month of May? Balmy breezes? Sweet-smelling flowers? How about root canal treatment?

The last item might seem out of place…but for the last ten years, Root Canal Awareness week has been celebrated in May. So let’s take a closer look at this important—and often misunderstood—dental procedure.

What we commonly call a “root canal” is a special treatment that can save diseased teeth which might otherwise be lost. But the root canal itself is actually a set of hollow, branching passages deep inside the hard outer tissue of the tooth. The tiny “canals” contain the tooth’s soft pulp, including nerves, blood vessels and connective tissue. These tissues help teeth grow during childhood but aren’t necessary in healthy adult teeth—and, what’s worse, they can become infected via deep cavity or a crack in the tooth’s outer layers.

When bacteria infect the pulp tissue, the inflammation often causes intense discomfort. In time, the harmful microorganisms can also pass through the tooth’s root and into the tissue of the jaw, resulting in a painful abscess. Eventually, if it isn’t treated, the tooth will likely be lost.

Root canal treatment is designed to remove the infection, relieve the pain…and save the tooth. It is usually performed under anesthesia for your comfort. To begin the procedure, a small hole is made in the tooth’s enamel to give access to the pulp; then, tiny instruments are used to remove the diseased tissue and disinfect the tooth. Finally, it is sealed up against re-infection. Following treatment, a cap (or crown) is often needed to restore the tooth’s full function and appearance.

Despite some rumors you may have heard, root canal treatment is neither very painful nor likely to cause other health problems. So if you come across these discredited ideas, remember that dentists and dental specialists called endodontists perform some 25 million root canal procedures every year—and this treatment method  has been validated for decades.

Of course, like any medical procedure, root canal treatment is not 100% successful. While the procedure has a very high success rate, it’s possible that additional treatments will be needed in some cases. However, the alternative—extracting the tooth—has similar potential downsides; plus a replacement tooth will be needed to avoid the health and lifestyle troubles caused by missing teeth. But one thing is certain: Ignoring disease in the tooth’s soft tissues isn’t a good move, because the infection won’t go away on its own—and down the road it will only get worse.

So this May, while you’re taking time to smell the flowers, spare a thought for the often-misunderstood root canal. If you’d like more information on root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “A Step-By-Step Guide to Root Canal Treatment” and “Root Canal Treatment: What You Need to Know.”

By Ilya V. Freyman, DMD
August 25, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay   root canal   cavities  

Most people will develop at least one cavity at some point in their life. Good oral hygiene and regular trips to the dentist for a check-up root canaland professional dental cleaning can go a long way towards keeping the gums and teeth healthy and cavity free. But in some cases, the damage from a large cavity or trauma from an accident can be too severe to repair with a standard dental filling. A root canal can help to save a severely damaged tooth from extraction and permanent nerve damage.

Root Canal Treatment in Longwood, FL

Few dental procedures strike more fear and anxiety in people than a root canal. But in reality, root canals actually help to relieve tooth pain and repair damage that is too extensive for a standard filling. Ilya V. Freyman, DMD, PA, a Longwood, FL, dentist, treats small to moderate sized cavities with enamel colored fillings. In advanced cases of tooth decay, the resulting cavity is sometimes too large for a filling, resulting in pain, potential nerve damage, and putting the tooth at greater risk for extraction.

In cases of trauma, bacteria can make its way into the space inside of the tooth that contains the pulp and nerve endings. A root canal clears away bacteria and damaged tissue to relieve pain and save the tooth. A filling restores the function and cosmetic appearance of the tooth; a root canal cleans and protects the soft tissue inside the tooth from further damage. Once the root canal has been completed, the tooth can be enhanced with a crown or bonding. A dental exam is necessary to determine whether a filling or root canal is necessary to treat an injured tooth.

Find a Dentist in Longwood, FL

For more information on prevention and treatment options for tooth decay and gum disease, contact the office of Dr. Ilya V. Freyman by calling (407) 260-0224 to schedule an appointment today.